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The art gallery of the exhibition; a selection from the paintings and sculpture exhibited by Alma-Tadema, Bierstadt, Huntingdon, Moran

The art gallery of the exhibition; a selection from the paintings and sculpture exhibited by Alma-Tadema, Bierstadt, Huntingdon, Moran

18053884
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Описание
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1877 Excerpt: ...only half disengaged from the Night, whose vail sweeps lingeringly from her forehead to the ground, holds and scatters upon the earth those blossoms whose petals are opened by the winds of morning, and whose blushes are copied from the blushes of the dawn. Such an evanescent idea ought to be sculptured in mist; but Mr. Bailly is able to give a mist-like tenuity to marble. An instructive comparison of the overcoming the technical difficulties of sculpture may be made by looking first at Mr. Bailly's lightly-poised figure, and then at some of the sculptures which Italy has sent over with a lavish hand to the Centennial Exhibition. However these statues may disappoint the lovers of classicality and repose, there is no question that in overcoming the stubbornness of material, they teach many a valuable lesson to our chiselers. We would indicate, as special examples of the triumph over this kind of difficulty, the hair in Caroni's "Africaine" (page 40), and the dressing-robe in the same artist's "Telegram of Love" (page 32). These works, though completely dissevered from the Greek theory of sculpture, have a rich, pictorial, and as it were, colored quality of their own which justifies the theory on which they are carved. If the success in representing texture were attained by an uncommon and worthless degree of mere finish, it would not be commendable; but examination will convince us that it is not the difficulty or the patience, but the live flash and expressiveness of the touch that gives the effect. The flowered silk of the dressing-gown in "The Telegram" gives no evidence of excessive difficulty overcome: it is its felicitous invention which strikes us. The heavy crisped tresses of the "Africaine" are no more closely ...