History of composing machines

History of composing machines

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 Excerpt: ... CALENDOLI. finger was raised. The grooves in the bottom of the type assisted in the assembling of the letters, they being supported on a guide rail while assembling KEMP'S TYPE-BAR MACHINE. William Kemp, Jr., was the next inventor to adopt this idea, his machine of 1894 showing a method of casting and assembling short, special type and mounting them in lines on prepared bases. He proposed to use a type-wheel carrying the dies deeply sunken on its periphery and, in conjunction with a mold to form a tenon joint, cast the type and deposit it on the bases prepared to receive the lines. THE COMPOSITE TYPE-BAR MACHINE. Another machine of the type-composing, barforming class was developed by Lucien A. Brott, of Brooklyn, New York, in 1896. Following the lines of Fowler's typecasting machine, Brott constructed a novel apparatus which he called the Composite Typebar machine, which was probably the most compact typesetting machine ever built. It occupied but eight square feet of floor space, weighed 250 pounds and was run by one-tenth horse-power. The machine was provided with a series of molds, one for each letter in the alphabet. Metal was cast into these molds and the type deposited directly into the channels of the composing mechanism, keeping them supplied. The improvement over Fowler's invention was in the novel means provided for the justification of the lines. The type was shorter than type-high to allow for the subsequent casting around the base of the line, and was withdrawn from the channels by the operation of the keyboard. Short steel wedges were brought between the words, these lying at right angles to the length of the type. When the line was completed it was justified by the wedges and lifted to the metal-pot, were molten metal was cast upon the bott...