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Business of Visual Arts: History of Art Auction Sales, Art Valuation, Associated American Artists, Art Dealer, Contemporary Art Gallery

Business of Visual Arts: History of Art Auction Sales, Art Valuation, Associated American Artists, Art Dealer, Contemporary Art Gallery

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Описание
Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: History of Art Auction Sales, Art Valuation, Associated American Artists, Art Dealer, Contemporary Art Gallery, Rothko Case, Art Appraisal, Art Finance, Blockage Discount, the Conceptual Framework, Art World, Artist's Statement, Artist Exploitation, Art World Economics, Free Art License, Against Drm License, Commission. Excerpt: An art sale is the practice of selling objects of art work, in most cases at auctions. In England this dates from the latter part of the 17th century, when in most cases the names of the auctioneers were suppressed. Evelyn (under date June 21, 1693) mentions a "great auction of pictures (Lord Melford's) in the Banquetting House, Whitehall," and the practice is frequently referred to by other contemporary and later writers. Before the introduction of regular auctions the practice was, as in the case of the famous collection formed by Charles I., to price each object and invite purchasers, just as in other departments of commerce. But this was a slow process, especially in the case of pictures, and lacked the incentive of excitement. The first really important art collection to come under the hammer was that of Edward, Earl of Oxford, dispersed by Cock, under the Piazza, Covent Garden, on 8 March 1741/2 and the five following days, six more days being required by the coins. Nearly all the leading men of the day, including Horace Walpole, attended or were represented at this sale, and the prices varied from five shillings for an anonymous bishop's "head" to 165 guineas for Vandyck's group of "Sir Kenelm Digby, lady, and son". The next great dispersal was Dr Richard Mead's extensive collection, of which the pictures, coins and engraved gems,