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Outdoor Sculptures in Russia: Monument to the Conquerors of Space, Garibaldi Monument in Taganrog, Monument to Alexander Ii

Outdoor Sculptures in Russia: Monument to the Conquerors of Space, Garibaldi Monument in Taganrog, Monument to Alexander Ii

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Chapters: Monument to the Conquerors of Space, Garibaldi Monument in Taganrog, Monument to Alexander Ii, Worker and Kolkhoz Woman, the Motherland Calls, Peter I Monument in Taganrog, Millennium of Russia, Chekhov Monument in Taganrog, Alexander I Statue in Taganrog, Peter the Great Statue, Ranevskaya Monument, Monument to Minin and Pozharsky, Cosmonauts Alley. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 47. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: The Monument "To the Conquerors of Space" (Russian: ) was erected in Moscow in 1964 to celebrate achievements of the Soviet people in space exploration. The Memorial Museum of Cosmonautics is located inside the base of the monument. The monument is located outside of the main entry to today's All-Russia Exhibition Centre (known until 1992 as the Exhibition of Achievements of the National Economy, VDNKh), in the northeastern part of Moscow, near Prospekt Mira ("Peace Avenue"). The easiest access is from the VDNKh subway station. Since the 1960s, this part of Moscow in general has had a high concentration of space-themed sights and names: besides the monument and the museum under it, the grand "Cosmos" pavilion in the Exhibition Centre displayed many artifacts of the Soviet space program. Many streets in the area have been named after the precursors of the space program (Nikolai Kibalchich, Friedrich Zander, Yuri Kondratyuk) and its participants (Sergey Korolyov). The Cosmonauts Alley south of the monument features busts of Soviet cosmonauts. The choice of this part of Moscow for space-related names and monuments may have been inspired by the fact that Prospekt Mira runs toward the north-eastern suburbs of Moscow, where, in Podlipki (today's Korolyov City) much of the space program was based. Korolyov himself lived in a house within a few blocks from the mo...More: http://booksllc.net/?id=7682815