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Inuit Art: Masks Among Eskimo Peoples, Museum of Inuit Art, Winnipeg Art Gallery, Eskimo Artist: Kenojuak, the Living Stone, Dennos Museum Center (Eng)

Inuit Art: Masks Among Eskimo Peoples, Museum of Inuit Art, Winnipeg Art Gallery, Eskimo Artist: Kenojuak, the Living Stone, Dennos Museum Center (Eng)

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Chapters: Masks Among Eskimo Peoples, Museum of Inuit Art, Winnipeg Art Gallery, Eskimo Artist: Kenojuak, the Living Stone, Dennos Museum Center. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 29. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: InuitCommons Wiktionary MetisCommons WiktionaryInuit art refers to artwork produced by Inuit, that is, the people of the Arctic previously known as Eskimos, a term that is now often considered offensive outside Alaska. Historically their preferred medium was ivory, but since the establishment of southern markets for Inuit art in 1945, prints and figurative works carved in relatively soft stone such as soapstone, serpentinite, or argillite have also become popular. Tyara Maskette, ivory, 35mm high, Dorset Culture, CMCAround 4000 BCE nomads known as the Pre-Dorset or the Arctic small tool tradition (ASTT) crossed over the Bering Strait from Siberia into Alaska, the Canadian Arctic, Greenland, and Newfoundland. Very little remains of them, and only a few preserved artifacts carved in ivory could be considered works of art. The Dorset culture, which became culturally distinct around 600 BCE, produced a significant amount of figurative art in the mediums of ivory, bone, antler, and on rare occasion stone. Subjects included birds, bears, walruses, seals, and human figures, as well as remarkably small masks. The Dorsets depicted bears and other animals in ivory with lines indicating their skeletal system incised on the surface of the ivory; bears in such a style are known as "flying bears". These items had a magical or religious significance, and were either worn as amulets to ward off evil spirits, or used in shamanic rituals. Around 1000 CE, the people of the Thule culture, ancestors of today's Inuit, migrated from northern Alaska and either displaced or slaughtered the ea...More: http://booksllc.net/?id=12962782