Impressionist Artists: Herman Rose, Max Slevogt, Eduard Von Keyserling, Milton Becerra, Jean-Louis Forain, Nouvelle Athenes

Impressionist Artists: Herman Rose, Max Slevogt, Eduard Von Keyserling, Milton Becerra, Jean-Louis Forain, Nouvelle Athenes

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Chapters: Herman Rose, Max Slevogt, Eduard Von Keyserling, Milton Becerra, Jean-Louis Forain, Nouvelle Athenes, Luis Alvarez de Lugo, Atsuko Tsurumi. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 24. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Herman Rose was the professional pseudonym of Herman Rappaport (November 6, 1909 December 4, 2007), an American painter and artist. He was best known for his depictions of cityscapes, including his painting 74th Street Rooftops From Studio." Herman Rappaport was born in Brooklyn, New York. He was originally trained as a draftsman and studied at the National Academy of Design in 1926. He was employed by the Works Progress Administration's Murals Division under Arshile Gorky from 1934 until 1939. Rappaport began using the name Herman Rose when he held his first solo art exhibition in 1946 at the Charles Egan Gallery in New York City. Although he initially began as an Expressionistic painter, he became known for small, light-filled Impressionist paintings of cityscapes and skies by the early 1950s. Rose's paintings and images were often composed of very small dabs of paint and tiny, blurry "squares," which combined to create the image on canvas, his favorite medium. He also depicted still life in his work. New York Times art critic Hilton Kramer wrote of Rose's work in 1981, "{he} must surely be counted among the most beautiful works anyone has produced in this challenging medium for many years." The Art in America art critic Lawrence Campbell wrote of his work in 1990, "Herman Rose, who is, in my opinion, the greatest living painter of landscape and still life in the U.S., has never for a moment abandoned the practice of painting from direct observation. ... Yet when Rose looks at anything, he seems able to participate with his entire being in the scene 'out there,'...More: http://booksllc.net/?id=15042316