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Circle Dances: Big Apple, Circle Dance, Hora, Kantu, Arkan, Ramkbach, Choreia, Jamrieng Samai, Ramvong, Khorovod, Corridinho, Swing Rueda

Circle Dances: Big Apple, Circle Dance, Hora, Kantu, Arkan, Ramkbach, Choreia, Jamrieng Samai, Ramvong, Khorovod, Corridinho, Swing Rueda

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Chapters: Big Apple, Circle Dance, Hora, Kantu, Arkan, Ramkbach, Choreia, Jamrieng Samai, Ramvong, Khorovod, Corridinho, Swing Rueda. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 45. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: The Big Apple is both a partner dance and a circle dance that originated in the Afro-American community of the United States in the beginning of the 20th century. The exact origin of the Big Apple is unclear but one author suggests that the dance originated from the "ring shout", a group dance associated with religious observances that was founded before 1860 by African Americans on plantations in South Carolina and Georgia. The ring shout is described as a dance with "counterclockwise circling and high arm gestures" that resembled the Big Apple. It is still practiced today in small populations of the southern United States. The dance that eventually became known as the Big Apple is speculated to have been created in the early 1930s by African American youth dancing at the Big Apple Club, which was at the former House of Peace Synagogue on Park Street in Columbia, South Carolina. The synagogue was converted into a black juke joint called the "Big Apple Night Club". In 1936, three white students from the University of South Carolina Billy Spivey, Donald Davis, and Harold "Goo-Goo" Wiles heard the music coming from the juke joint as they were driving by. Even though it was very unusual for whites to go into a black club, the three asked the club's owner, Frank "Fat Sam" Boyd, if they could enter. Skip Davis, the son of Donald Davis, said that "Fat Sam made two conditions. They had to pay twenty five cents each and they had to sit in the balcony." During the next few months, the white students brought more friends to the night club to watch the black dancers. The white students became...More: http://booksllc.net/?id=414059